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Concentration Camps & Slavery

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Dr. Yosef Ben Jochannan On Black People Making Their Own Holidays

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WDIA: The First Radio Station In America Programmed For Black Listeners

White-owned radio station WDIA, first went on the air on June 7, 1947. Its original musical format was country and light pop. However, this programming was not successful for station owners John Pepper and Dick Ferguson. Therefore, they decided to change the format and broadcast black music. The change in format made the station a […]

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Quote Of The Day

“African Americans had long constituted the core workforce in New York City and its hinterland. In 1771 there were roughly twenty-one thousand African Americans in the region around New York City, virtually all enslaved- and many of them were the children and grandchildren of slaves.” -From, “Slavery In New York” Tweet

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On This Day In 1898: The Wilmington Insurrection

The Wilmington race riot of 1898 is also historically known as the Wilmington Massacre of 1898, and the Wilmington Coup d’etat of 1898. This incident is reportedly the only instance of and attempted coup d’etat in the history of the United States. On November 10, 1898, members of the Democratic Party attempted to overthrow elected […]

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Black History Fact Of The Day: How NYC’s Wall Street Got Its Name

In March 1653, Peter Stuyvesant, the director of the slave-trading Dutch West India Company and the Director-General of New Netherland, now known as New York, ordered slaves to build blockades to serve as protective barriers for the area of lower Manhattan. Stuyvesant reportedly demanded that the log-made barricade be “12 feet long, 18 inches in […]

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When Washington Square Park Was Owned By African Americans

Recently, burial vaults were discovered underneath Washington Square Park. Archaeologists are reportedly still trying to determine the exact origins of the vaults; however, they claim that they believe the vaults date back to the 19th century. Way before the 19th century, African Americans who were brought to the United States as chattel, owned approximately 130 […]

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The History Of The African Tradition Of Jumping The Broom

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A Brief History Of Black Jockeys

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Metropolitan Museum Of Art’s First African Photography Exhibit

I have a question, Where did they get the pictures from if they can’t identify the photographers and photograph subjects? We need our own museums and archives so we can study ourselves, instead of having others always dissecting our culture. Tweet

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