Book Excerpt Of The Week: “Black Is The Color Of My TV Tube” By: Gil Noble

Black Is The Color Of My TV Tube“As my knowledge has increased, my ego has decreased proportionally. Knowledge is the mother of humility and makes one realize how little is really known overall. Some people have misused knowledge by studying how to perfect ways to enslave and dominate others. To overcome these people, one must be equipped with more and better knowledge.” -From, “Black Is The Color Of My TV Tube” By: Gil Noble

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Anecdote Of The Week: When Your Blessing Is Served To You On A Platter And You’re Still Hungry

Farmland“Bob put me through my workout paces and encouraged a lifestyle bullet around eating whole foods (long before I’d ever heard of the story that shares that name and mission).

I resisted. But even as different diets came and went, his advise remained consistent and wise: Eat foods that make you thrive.

A few years ago, I finally got the big aha and started growing my own vegetables. And what began with a few rows of lettuce, some tomatoes, and basil (my favorite herb) in my backyard in Santa Barbara eventually became a genuine farm in Maui. My gardening interest grew into a passion…

In rural Mississippi, where I was born, a garden meant survival. In Nashville, where I later lived, my father always cleared a “patch” by the side of our house, where he would grow collard greens, tomatoes, crowder peas, and butter beans.

Today that’s my favorite meal; add some cornbread and I’m clicking my heels. But when I was say girl, I saw no value in eating freshly grown foods. “Why can’t we have store bought food like other people?” I’d complain. I wanted my vegetables to come from the “valley of the jolly- ho, ho, ho- Green Giant”! Having to eat from the garden made me feel poor.

I now know for sure how blessed I was to have access to fresh food- something not every family today can take for granted.

Thank you, Lord, for growth.

I’ve worked hard to sow the seeds for a life in which I get to keep expanding my dreams. One of those dreams is for everyone to be able to eat fresh food that goes from farm to table- because better food is the foundation for a better life.”-From, “What I Know For Sure” By: Oprah Winfrey

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Book Excerpt Of The Week: “Ruminations” By: Krs-One

Ruminations “If your educator is a murderer, a rapist, a liar, chances are you will be taught to be one of these as well. This is why memorizing education without questioning is very destructive.

Memory accepts everything. By questioning what you think the truth is, you arrive at the truth. If you never question the truth or the lie, you really don’t know the difference between the two. You are going only according to what your teacher told you, you really don’t know for yourself what the truth is. In this case you are not an intellectual, you are a Memorex tape. This keeps us on a primitive level where the environment control self. We must rise up and become intelligent human beings.” -From, “Ruminations” By KRS-One

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Book Excerpt Of The Week: “Black-On-Black Violence” By: Amos Wilson

Black On Black Violence“What many African Americans, including Black-on-Black criminals desire most are those things manufactured, owned, controlled, and sold by their White oppressors. African Americans rarely want or value anything else.

The White American ruling class devalues what it doesn’t own or control, and invests with inflated value what it does own or control, thereby provoking possessive/obsessive desires in the deprived groups it dominates.

It sets the material and social prices to be paid for what it owns, controls, and/or offers for sale. Through its manipulation of production and prices it seeks to manipulate the social conditions and organization (as well as disorganization) of the behavior, perception and consciousness of those who seek to acquire what it produces.” -From, “Black-on-Black Violence” By: Amos Wilson

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Book Excerpt Of The Week: “Black-On-Black Violence” By: Amos Wilson

Black On Black Violence“Your freedom is the superbal expression of slavery- the freedom of slaves.
You are free to speak as long as no one listens.
Free to explain as long as no one understands.
Free to sing and dance as long as you entertain those who would have you sing and dance on a tightrope above an open grave.
Free to think as long as you think feelings.
Free to love as long as it is your tormentors and not yourself that you love.
Free to assemble as long as you gather together to screw each other.
Free to engage in self-defense as long as it is truth and reality against which you defend yourself.
Free to kiss as long as you kiss the a** of the one who offends you.
You have a right to a fair trial before a jury of your peers as long as you are a criminal.
You are free to spend your money as you like as long as you like to spend it with those who spitefully use you;
Who use it to finance your execution and to bury you in your store-bought finest.” -From, “Black-on-Black Violence” By: Amos Wilson

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Book Excerpt Of The Week: “Soul Stories” By: Gary Zukav

“An intention is not a wish. A wish doesn’t cause anything to happen. An intention pushes against the way things are in your life. Those things push back exactly the same way. (Remember, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction).

You can see what your intentions are by looking at what is happening around you. Are the people in your life kind and loving? If so, your intentions are kind and loving. (And you are a member of the love and kindness clubs). Are the people around you angry or jealous? If so, your intentions are angry or jealous. (And you are a member of the anger and jealousy clubs).

You intentions create everything you experience. For example, if you play baseball, your intentions, not the game, determine what you experience. If you intend to win, you will be anxious before each game. You will be miserable if you lose. You will worry about you teammates, and how they play. If you intend to do your best, your experience will be very different. You will look forward to playing. You will be relaxed and ready for anything. You will be grateful to the other team for giving you the chance to do your best.” -From, “Soul Stories” By: Gary Zukav

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Book Excerpt Of The Week: “The Big Sea” By: Langston Hughes

The Big Sea Langston Hughes “Some critics say that that is what happened to certain Negro writers too opinion that they ceased to write to amuse themselves and began to write to amuse and entertain white people, and in so doing distorted and over-colored their material, and left out a great many things they thought would offend their American brothers of a lighter complexion. Maybe- since Negroes have writer-racketeers, as has any other race. But I have known almost all of them, and most of the good ones have tried to be honest, write honestly, and express their world as they saw it.”-From, “The Big Sea” By: Langston Hughes

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Segregated Libraries

Albany, GA 1962“When the sit-in movement started in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960 black people of nearby Danville had also been stirred to sit-in. There main focus then was on desegregating the ‘public’ library. As everywhere in the South, black people were denied the use of the town’s main library and assigned (in Danville, but not in all Southern towns) a miserable branch library with a few torn books. The Danville Library fought desegregation to the death, for it was not just another library, but a Confederate Memorial sacred to the white folks, the site of the last full cabinet meeting of the Confederacy before General Lee announced his surrender. Eventually faced with a court order to desegregate, the library chose instead to close from September to November, 1960, and reopen desegregated- but without chairs, and with the cost of a library card raised to $2.50 a year.” -From, “The Makings Of Black Revolutionaries” By: James Forman

[SIDEBAR; The above picture is Albany, Georgia. 1992]

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Book Excerpt Of The Week: “Sweet Expectations: Michele Hoskins’ Recipe For Success” By: Michele Hoskins

“Some people remain enslaved by the examples that they see around them. If they lacked role models, then they find it difficult to grow beyond a certain point. They can see few possibilities for themselves beyond what they see. But you have to stretch.” From, “Sweet Expectations: Michele Hoskins’ Recipe For Success” By: Michele Hoskins

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