Mark Winston Griffith Of The Brooklyn Movement Center On Gentrification

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Gentrification: “What Used To Be Ours Is Now Theirs”

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The Attack On Black Communities: The Gentrification Of Bed Stuy

“They won’t give you a loan to start a business…” “They’re not going to sell it to you.” Tweet

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Black History Fact Of The Day: The African American Man Who Founded Bushwick, Brooklyn

In 1661, a man who was known as “Francisco the Negro” helped to found what is now Bushwick, Brooklyn. He was one of the 23 founders of that area. In 1661, Bushwick was known as Boswijk. [Bibliography: Slavery In New York] Tweet

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East New York, Brooklyn: African Burial Grounds

683 Barbey Street. Brooklyn, New York. Tweet

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These Are The Ads In Your Neighborhood: The Corruption Of Children

Why would a picture with a character that has been marketed to children for decades be captioned like this? SMH. Train station; Brooklyn, New York. Tweet

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Dr. W.E.B. DuBois’s Brooklyn, New York Address

A one time Dr. W.E.B Dubois lived in Brooklyn, New York. He lived at 31 Grace Court in Brooklyn Heights. Reportedly, Dr. DuBois bought the house from Arthur Miller, who wrote his play, “Death of a Salesman” at the address.” Tweet

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Black History Fact Of The Day: How Enslaved Africans Built Brooklyn

I came across a 2012 Huffington Post article written by Alan Singer that explores how enslaved Africans built up Brooklyn. The article also discusses a Brooklyn-located African burial ground. Here’s an excerpt from the article: “At the time of the American Revolution about a third of the population of Kings County were enslaved Africans, but […]

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Brooklyn High-Schooler Documents His Experience With “Stop and Frisk”

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Black History Fact Of The Day

There is a section of Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn called “Weeksville.” It derived its moniker from James Weeks. According to the Weeksville Society’s website, James Weeks was an African American who purchased the land- which now bears his name- in 1838. He brought the land from Henry Thompson, who was also a “free African American.” Weeksville was […]

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